22
Oct
News
Landlord Obligations and Responsibilities

As a landlord renting your property out to tenants on the property market, you have a number of obligations and responsibilities. These are written into law and certainly aren’t optional. If you want to make sure that you don’t land yourself in hot water, it’s important to understand these obligations.To help make things as clear as possible to you, we’re going to cover what you need to know about these vital obligations and responsibilities. So read on now to find out more.<h3>Meeting Safety Standards</h3>The first duty a landlord has to their tenant is to provide a home that’s safe and meets all the legal safety standards. Each floor of the property must have a smoke alarm fitted and any rooms with coal fire or wood burning stoves must also have a carbon monoxide detector in place.Gas appliances must come with a valid gas safety certificate, relevant fire safety standards must be met and all electrical devices must be safe to use, which means PAT testing them. Relevant local authorities have the right to assess your property for potential hazards and any safety breaches that might be present.<h3>Energy Performance</h3>When you’re a landlord, you need to purchase an EPC for the property, and this is something that needs to be done before you find a tenant to fill it. An EPC is an energy performance certificate. The certificate will give your property a rating, and the minimum rating you need to have before letting it out is an E.As of 2018, it became a breach of the legislation to rent out a property that has a lower energy rating than that. And there are fines in place for people who break this rule, which can rise as high as £4,000.<h3>Right to Rent</h3>Landlords now have a duty and responsibility to ensure the people they’re providing accommodation to and renting out their properties to have a right to rent. That means, in most cases, checking to see that the tenant has the right to legally reside in the UK.If a landlord rents out a property to someone who the government classes as an illegal immigrant who doesn’t have the right to reside here, there are penalties that they can receive. The maximum is 5 years prison time. So it’s worth making sure you don’t overlook this when finding tenants for your properties.<h3>Protecting the Tenant’s Deposit</h3>As the landlord, you’ll be paid a deposit by the tenant for potential damage caused by the tenant during their stay in your property. But when you receive the deposit, you’re obligated to protect the tenancy deposit with a deposit protection scheme that’s been approved by the UK government.It can be more difficult for you to bring the tenancy to an end and you can face fines if you fail to protect the deposit in a way that’s considered adequate. Unless there’s a dispute over damage to the property or any rent that hasn’t been paid, the deposit must be returned to the tenant in full at the end of the tenancy.<h3>Repairs</h3>When there’s a problem with the property and its structure, it’s the responsibility of the landlord to fix these issues and ensure repairs are carried out in a timely manner. So, any problems with the walls, roof or any other aspect of the structure have to be taken care of by the landlord of the property.Cracked windows, boiler problems, leaks, chimney problems, wall issues and drain and guttering problems are also all the responsibility of the landlord. If you choose a managed service delivered by a property management company, maintenance can be taken care of for you.<h3>Accessing the Property</h3>As a landlord, it’s important to be very careful when it comes to accessing a tenanted property. Even if you’re arriving to carry out repairs or inspections, you can’t simply arrive at random or time of your choosing if it interferes with your tenant’s right to privacy.You need to provide your tenant with a reasonable amount of notice and arrange a time to visit when it’s suitable for them for you to arrive. This is something that should ideally be written into your tenancy agreement so you can be sure that everyone is on the same page.All of these things should be taken seriously by landlords, as they’re considered essential parts of operating as an ethical landlord. These are also legal obligations and responsibilities, and the last thing you want is to go through expensive court proceedings as a result of unnecessary mistakes.Generally, if you have a number of properties, it’s always best to hire a property management company to keep on top of all of your legal requirements and maintenance. Based in Milton Keynes, LevelUP property management can handle each of the elements above. Read more about our <a href="https://leveluppropertymanagement.com/property-management-milton-keynes/">property management in Milton Keynes here.</a>

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22
Oct
News
The benefits of using a property management company

If you’re a landlord or you’re about to become one, it’s important to consider how your property is going to be managed once there are tenants in it. It’s something that so many landlords overlook, and they then end up regretting it later.There are many benefits that come with choosing a property management company. Otherwise, you’ll end up dealing with a lot of issues yourself. In reality, these things can be taken care of by a property management company acting on your behalf. Here are the benefits of choosing this option.<h3>An Accessible Point of Contact for Tenants</h3>Having a point of contact for tenants is obviously essential, but many landlords can’t dedicate their time to be an accessible point of contact that’s always there and ready to respond to tenants. With a property management company, they can offer a 24-hour service and respond to tenants on your behalf. That covers times when you wouldn’t ordinarily be available.Listening to and reacting to problems and complaints from tenants is a lot of work and it’s not to be underestimated. For most problems, a management company can take care of these issues for you and they won’t need you to be involved or consulted, meaning you don’t have to do much work at all when there’s a management company on the case.<h3>Lower Chance of Legal Issues Arising</h3>As a landlord, you won’t want to get involved in any unnecessary legal battles. That’s clear. However, this can happen but can be avoided or have the risk reduced by working with a property management company.Unlike many landlords, especially ones new to all this, property management companies know the law, what it means in practice and any changes to the law that might happen. If you put trust in them, you’ll know that the situation is being dealt with by knowledgeable professionals. You won’t have to worry about doing it all alone.<h3>Tenants Will be More Likely to Stick Around</h3>When you’re trying to rent out a property, the last thing you want is a high turnover of tenants. If you’re offering a slow service to tenants when they have a problem, they’ll be much less likely to stick around and might look to rent a property somewhere else instead if they’re not happy with your performance as a landlord.But if you choose a property management company, they’ll be able to dedicate more time and manpower to responding to issues tenants have. And as a result, your tenants will be much happier and more likely to stick around. Tenants want the peace of mind that comes with knowing they’re going to be looked after when a problem arises.<h3>Ensures Rent is Consistently Paid On Time</h3>Having the rent you’re owed paid on time is a top priority when you’re a landlord. However, this is one of the most common problems landlords face when renting out their properties. CHasing rent can be tiring, frustrating and often awkward, and that’s not what anyone wants to be dealing with.Having a property management company working on your behalf means that you don’t have to waste your time chasing overdue rent payments. Instead, the property management company takes care of that for you. They can enforce the rules and ensure you get the money you’re due on time. It’s a tough task so it’s nice to have someone else do it for you when necessary.<h3>Access to an In-House Maintenance Team</h3>Maintenance can be frustrating, and there will often be things that you don’t have the tools or capabilities to take care of yourself. But those fixes still need to be made due to your legal obligations as a landlord. The best solution to this and the one many landlords take advantage of is working with a property management company.It’s a lot cheaper to have access to an in-house maintenance team as part of your agreement with your property management company than to hire an external team to take care of maintenance for you. The team will also be able to become familiar with the tenants living in your property over time.Anyone who’s experienced problems as a landlord knows how tough it can be. And having an extra layer of management and support definitely makes your job a whole lot easier than it would otherwise be. So if the benefits discussed above appeal to you, be sure to consider using a property management company for your tenanted homes.Generally, if you have a number of properties, it’s always best to hire a property management company to keep on top of all of your legal requirements and maintenance. <a href="https://leveluppropertymanagement.com/property-management-milton-keynes/">Based in Milton Keynes, LevelUP property management</a> can manage properties around London and the home counties. Get in touch with us today for more information.

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18
Nov
News
Right to manage – all you need to know

Introduced through the Commonhold and Leasehold Reform Act of 2002, the Right To Manage (or RTM, or right to management), offers leaseholders in a property to take over the management of the building, even without the agreement of the landlord. Though this may be a scary notion for landlords and letting agents, it’s important to take a closer look at what that can mean, the costs, the benefits to tenants, and the process.<h3>What is ‘Right To Manage.’</h3>Right To Manage (RTM) offers leaseholds the right to take over the management of the property by setting up a specific type of organisation (called a right to manage company). It’s not necessary for the leaseholders to gain landlord approval, to prove mismanagement, or even to seek out a court order. However, RTM companies do have very real responsibilities that they have to meet. These responsibilities include managing and collecting service charges, upkeep for communal areas and building structures such as the roof, as well as handling complaints.<h3>The process</h3>To qualify for RTM, the building must be at least partly self-contained, have at least two leasehold flats within it, have no more than 25% floor area that isn’t residential, and must have at least 66% of the leaseholders having leases that are longer than 21 years. Furthermore, more than half of the leaseholders that quality has to be in favour of forming an RTM company.It takes around five-to-seven months to register an RTM, and notices must be served in accordance with the law to make sure that the company is fully compliant with all the relevant regulations. It’s easy to miss out on some of the more technical aspects of the registration, though the process is relatively straightforward, so it’s usually recommended to do so with the help of a property management company.<h3>How much does right to manage cost?</h3>The costs of setting up an RTM can depend, as they have to follow specific formats under the law. Information has to be downloaded from the land registry. For each title associated with the property, it costs £3, and there are postage costs for sending the necessary notices that have to be served. Photocopying costs for keeping copies of notices and other documents must also be considered.There are also claim notice costs, and costs for the tribunal to determine if the leaseholders have the right to form an RTM. These costs are only incurred if the leaseholders aren’t found entitled to the Right to Manage. To find out the specific costs, it’s important to ensure you’re working with a professional, experienced property management team who understands the Right to Manage process and the specifics of your property.<h3>Is Right to Manage a good idea?</h3>For disgruntled tenants and leaseholders, a Right To Manage Company can allow them a much more direct control over the property that they live in. It can cut down on delays on repairs and maintenance, and allows you to be involved in the decision making process of how your money is spent. If the leaseholders are willing to take on the responsibility, they may find it worth it.Want to find out more? Get in contact with our <a href="https://leveluppropertymanagement.com/property-management-kent/">property management team in Kent</a>, London, or <a href="https://leveluppropertymanagement.com/property-management-milton-keynes/">Milton Keynes. </a>

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27
Oct
News
What does a property manager do? Roles and responsibilities

They’re often seen as the front-end of the property industry, it’s safe to say that most people are familiar with the day to day roles of a property manager. But what about the actual job of a property manager? What is a property manager, and what does a property manager do?<h2>What is a property manager?</h2>Well let me put it this way, a property manager is essentially the bread and butter of the property industry. Without the support and work of a property manager, the industry would essentially not be running as smoothly as it is now, and that’s an understatement. Property managers are vital in making sure that a property can hold or increase its value, they have a wide range of responsibilities.  Property managers also collect service charges from the leaseholders in accordance with the terms of lease. Service charges include management fees which is the fee for the service.<h3>What does a property manager do?</h3>Property managers manage a property in accordance with the terms of the lease and the statutory requirements on behalf of their client. They also wear many hats as property managers require the knowledge of landlord and tenant law, health and safety, accounting, construction and so much more.Professional management comes with many benefits and the services that are being provided by a property manager is covered within a managing agreement. Property management duties are based on a contract rather than legislation and the marketing agreement, covers the duties a client has asked a property manager to carry out.<h3>Who appoints a property manager?</h3>A property manager is appointed by a person or company who has the legal responsibility to see the delivery of services of the landlord under the terms of lease. Owners of a flat can get management responsibilities by freehold of a building. Freeholding is where the owner of the land doesn’t have a time limit to their period of ownership.<h3>Property management agent responsibilities</h3>A property manager may provide a wide variety of duties, such as:<ul> <li>Being responsible for managing rent – Collecting rent is a major responsibility of a landlord. This means that it’s one of the most common jobs a landlord would pass to a property manager to carry out. The rent responsibilities of a property manager may include:</li> <li>Setting the rent – A property manager would set the correct rent level to attract potential tenants to the property. In order to determine the right range of rent, the property manager would look at the market where the property located and compare it to other properties in the same area.</li> <li>Collecting the rent – The property manager will then set up a system of collecting the rent. In order to maintain optimal cash flow, they’ll set a date to collect rent each month and may enforce late fees.</li> <li>Adjusting the rent – The property manager is then able to increase the rent each year, they’re also able to decrease it when necessary.</li> <li>Maintenance and repair roles –The property manager must keep the property in safe and habitable manner. They’re responsible for the physical management of the property which includes emergency and regular repairs. An example, however, could be damage to windows. This would depend on the terms of a lease as almost every drafted lease sets out respective obligations of the leaseholder and landlord to repair various parts of a building.</li> <li>Financial services – the property manager may be responsible for a wider range of financial matter for the owner of the property such as general accounting.</li></ul><h3>How to find the right property manager</h3>The first thing to consider when approaching a property manager would be to discuss how many properties they’re managing. You could then learn more about the business by asking questions such as if they currently own rental properties themselves.Or better yet, come to us. Here at LevelUp, we’re looking to challenge and modernize traditional methods of management by ensuring we’re readily available to respond to residents. We believe we’re the most contactable property managers around (how’s that for confidence?). We’ve got you covered, we’re experienced in assisting leaseholders, right to manage and resident’s management companies in changing property management. We’re also a friendly bunch! We enjoy visiting residents and the communities that surround them. We also host informal events to bring residents together! If you’re looking for a reliable property manager, please feel free to contact us for further information at info@leveluppropertymanagement.com.You can find our <a href="https://leveluppropertymanagement.com/property-management-kent/">property managers in Kent  </a>and <a href="https://leveluppropertymanagement.com/property-management-milton-keynes/">Milton Keynes.</a>

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27
Oct
News
Leasehold Property Management Complaints and What To Do About Them

<strong>At</strong><b> LevelUP, we aim to be transparent and change the way the property management service is delivered. So, in this month’s blog we’re going to give you some tips on how to tackle leasehold management company problems, list property management complaints and more.</b><h3><b>How to make a complaint against your property manager</b></h3><span style="font-weight: 400;">When it comes to property management, there may come a time when you may need to complain about your property agent. If you’re unhappy with the service being provided to you by a property agent, there are steps that you can take which will be provided below. But before we start, there are various types of property agents and it’s great to know the difference between them.</span><ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><b>Estate Agents</b><span style="font-weight: 400;"> – Market and sell properties to potential buyers. They’re usually employed by estate agencies.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><b>Managing Agents</b><span style="font-weight: 400;"> – A person or a company that manages property for an external owner.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><b>Letting Agents –</b><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Like estate agents, letting agents market and sell properties to potential buyers, the difference being that letting agents find tenants to rent properties in place of a landlord. They can also manage properties for the owner.</span></li></ul><span style="font-weight: 400;">Now that we’ve listed the differences between the different types of agents, let’s get to the main task at hand. Common complaints against your property manager and what to do about them.</span><h3><b>Common management company complaints</b></h3><span style="font-weight: 400;">Property management can be a tricky business. However, when it boils down, it’s a service-based industry meaning that your property manager should have your wellbeing at the forefront on their minds. You should expect them to maintain or maybe even exceed the standards set by the industry. It’s also important to be mindful about what may or may not be outside the property manager’s control.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Here are some of the most common property management complaints and tips on how to avoid them:</span><h3><b>Charging above market rent</b></h3><span style="font-weight: 400;">Rents are the main income stream for real estate investors therefore, the rent should be on par with the current market rates in order to increase potential income. Performing comparable rental listings or “rental comps” to help determine the value of a property to others on the market can help with this problem.</span><h3><b>Hidden fees</b></h3><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hidden fees are a massive problem in any industry so let’s help you avoid them. To avoid hidden fees, make sure you read a property management contract thoroughly before signing it and ask questions to get a better understanding of anything you do not understand. (There’s recently been a change in law so that agents can’t charge administration fees anymore).</span><h3><b>Mixed messages from a company </b></h3><span style="font-weight: 400;">To avoid getting different answers to the same question, ensure that you ask a salesperson about staff you may be dealing with once you’ve signed up in order to avoid future problems.</span><h3><b>Placing a bad tenant</b></h3><span style="font-weight: 400;">One of the most expensive mistakes in property management is placing a bad tenant. Make sure tenants are screened accordingly and keep communication to a healthy level to avoid any issues between a landlord and tenant.</span><h3><b>Not keeping promises </b></h3><span style="font-weight: 400;">A poor property management company can promise the world and give you deadlines for work to be done. The date comes and deadline comes and goes – without a word from your managers. Although delays happen, it’s important to manage the communication before complaints are made!</span><h3><b>Poor Communication </b></h3><span style="font-weight: 400;">Communication is crucial and non-communication can be a big deal breaker. A property manager should be communicating with a client regularly. And should be comfortable with a variety of communication methods and reports should be consistent on a monthly basis or depending on how their business operates, and questions should be answered quickly and clearly.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Other common problems:</span><ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><span style="font-weight: 400;">High maintenance fees</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Zero transparency</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Lack of interest</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Poor response times in emergencies</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Complaining directly to the agent</span></li></ul><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you do have a complaint against your property manager, it could help to speak directly to the agent first in order to put things right before you escalate your complaint.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Agents may not be able to resolve complaints immediately, therefore communication between an agent and client is vital.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Furthermore, if you’re not pleased with the way an agent handles your complaint, you could make a formal complaint to see that the issue is resolved. Give LevelUP a call and we will advise you on how to complain to your management agent.</span><h3><b>Changing your property manager</b></h3><span style="font-weight: 400;">With the current numbers of dispute with property management companies rising fast, it’s now common for clients to end contracts with property managers due to agreed terms not being met or having management company complaints. Here’s where we come in. We’re experienced in helping leaseholders, right to manage and resident companies change management services.</span><h4><b>What are your 3 options?</b></h4><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’re not happy with your current situation, you have several options to help you change property managers. There’s three main ways to change your property management company which are:</span><ol> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Appointing a new manager through a tribunal, using your right to manage, or setting up a resident’s association. We talk about how to change your property manager in detail here.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Appoint a new manager via a tribunal. </span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><span style="font-weight: 400;">In order to appoint a new manager, you need to be able to prove bad management. The first step is to send a landlord a section 22 notice, which will grant them the opportunity to fix the problems you’ve addressed. If this fails, you can apply to the first-tier tribunal to ask a new manager to be appointed.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Exercise your right no manage</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Leaseholders of flats have a right to manage, which enables allows them to take over the management of their property, they’re able to do this without a landlord’s permission by creating a right to manage company. It’s not necessary to prove bad management, although a minimum number of leaseholders needs to take part to set up the company.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Create a resident’s association</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">The final option is to form a resident’s association, this is a group of leaseholders that lease from the same landlord and have similar terms.</span></li></ol><span style="font-weight: 400;">Read the </span><a href="https://leveluppropertymanagement.com/how-to-change-property-management-company/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">full article on how to change property managers here</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">LevelUP are experienced in assisting leaseholders, Right to Manage and Residents Management Companies in changing management services. Please feel free to contact us for further information at info@leveluppropertymanagement.com or call us on 01322 907033. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">You can find out about our </span><a href="https://leveluppropertymanagement.com/property-management-kent/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">property management in Kent here</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. </span><h3><b>Related Reading</b></h3><ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><a href="https://leveluppropertymanagement.com/how-to-change-property-management-company/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">How to change property management company </span></a></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><a href="https://leveluppropertymanagement.com/property-management-responsibilities/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Roles and responsibilities – What does a property management company do?</span></a></li></ul><span style="font-weight: 400;">New </span><a href="https://leveluppropertymanagement.com/property-management-milton-keynes/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">property management office in Milton Keynes </span></a>

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27
Oct
News
Leasehold property management complaints and what to do about them

At LevelUP, we aim to be transparent and change the way the property management service is delivered. So, in this month’s blog we’re going to give you some tips on how to tackle leasehold management company problems, list property management complaints and more.<h3>How to make a complaint against your property manager</h3>When it comes to property management, there may come a time when you may need to complain about your property agent. If you’re unhappy with the service being provided to you by a property agent, there are steps that you can take which will be provided below. But before we start, there are various types of property agents and it’s great to know the difference between them.<ul> <li><strong>Estate Agents</strong> – Market and sell properties to potential buyers. They’re usually employed by estate agencies.</li> <li><strong>Managing Agents</strong> – A person or a company that manages property for an external owner.</li> <li><strong>Letting Agents –</strong> Like estate agents, letting agents market and sell properties to potential buyers, the difference being that letting agents find tenants to rent properties in place of a landlord. They can also manage properties for the owner.</li></ul>Now that we’ve listed the differences between the different types of agents, let’s get to the main task at hand. Common complaints against your property manager and what to do about them.<h3>Common management company complaints</h3>Property management can be a tricky business. However, when it boils down, it’s a service-based industry meaning that your property manager should have your wellbeing at the forefront on their minds. You should expect them to maintain or maybe even exceed the standards set by the industry. It’s also important to be mindful about what may or may not be outside the property manager’s control.Here are some of the most common property management complaints and tips on how to avoid them:<h3>Charging above market rent</h3>Rents are the main income stream for real estate investors therefore, the rent should be on par with the current market rates in order to increase potential income. Performing comparable rental listings or “rental comps” to help determine the value of a property to others on the market can help with this problem.<h3>Hidden fees</h3>Hidden fees are a massive problem in any industry so let’s help you avoid them. To avoid hidden fees, make sure you read a property management contract thoroughly before signing it and ask questions to get a better understanding of anything you do not understand. (There’s recently been a change in law so that agents can’t charge administration fees anymore).<h3>Mixed messages from a company</h3>To avoid getting different answers to the same question, ensure that you ask a salesperson about staff you may be dealing with once you’ve signed up in order to avoid future problems.<h3>Placing a bad tenant</h3>One of the most expensive mistakes in property management is placing a bad tenant. Make sure tenants are screened accordingly and keep communication to a healthy level to avoid any issues between a landlord and tenant.<h3>Not keeping promises</h3>A poor property management company can promise the world and give you deadlines for work to be done. The date comes and deadline comes and goes – without a word from your managers. Although delays happen, it’s important to manage the communication before complaints are made!<h3>Poor Communication</h3>Communication is crucial and non-communication can be a big deal breaker. A property manager should be communicating with a client regularly. And should be comfortable with a variety of communication methods and reports should be consistent on a monthly basis or depending on how their business operates, and questions should be answered quickly and clearly.Other common problems:<ul> <li>High maintenance fees</li> <li>Zero transparency</li> <li>Lack of interest</li> <li>Poor response times in emergencies</li> <li>Complaining directly to the agent</li></ul>If you do have a complaint against your property manager, it could help to speak directly to the agent first in order to put things right before you escalate your complaint.Agents may not be able to resolve complaints immediately, therefore communication between an agent and client is vital.Furthermore, if you’re not pleased with the way an agent handles your complaint, you could make a formal complaint to see that the issue is resolved. Give LevelUP a call and we will advise you on how to complain to your management agent.<h3>Changing your property manager</h3>With the current numbers of dispute with property management companies rising fast, it’s now common for clients to end contracts with property managers due to agreed terms not being met or having management company complaints. Here’s where we come in. We’re experienced in helping leaseholders, right to manage and resident companies change management services.<h4>What are your 3 options?</h4>If you’re not happy with your current situation, you have several options to help you change property managers. There’s three main ways to change your property management company which are:<ol> <li>Appointing a new manager through a tribunal, using your right to manage, or setting up a resident’s association. We talk about how to change your property manager in detail here.Appoint a new manager via a tribunal.</li> <li>In order to appoint a new manager, you need to be able to prove bad management. The first step is to send a landlord a section 22 notice, which will grant them the opportunity to fix the problems you’ve addressed. If this fails, you can apply to the first-tier tribunal to ask a new manager to be appointed.</li> <li>Exercise your right no manageLeaseholders of flats have a right to manage, which enables allows them to take over the management of their property, they’re able to do this without a landlord’s permission by creating a right to manage company. It’s not necessary to prove bad management, although a minimum number of leaseholders needs to take part to set up the company.</li> <li>Create a resident’s associationThe final option is to form a resident’s association, this is a group of leaseholders that lease from the same landlord and have similar terms.</li></ol>Read the <a href="https://leveluppropertymanagement.com/how-to-change-property-management-company/">full article on how to change property managers here</a>.LevelUP are experienced in assisting leaseholders, Right to Manage and Residents Management Companies in changing management services. Please feel free to contact us for further information at info@leveluppropertymanagement.com or call us on 01322 907033.You can find out about our <a href="https://leveluppropertymanagement.com/property-management-kent/">property management in Kent here</a>.

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1
Sep
News
New Client! LevelUP working with unique luxury apartments

At LevelUP we have ambition and want to change the way property management service is delivered. We deliver a tailored, bespoke service through open and transparent channels of communication afforded to us by better use of new technology.We are delighted to be involved with the estate management of a unique luxury development of elegant apartments and townhouses, in a historical setting, surrounded by acres of parkland and magnificent views across the Chiltern Hills. The development itself is architecturally award winning and finished to superior quality.The developers, a considerate, family run Italian firm, have guaranteed the best fixtures and fittings, exporting all direct from Italy. The former hotel and manor house is grade II listed and is thought to have much historical importance in the High Wycombe area. <img class="aligncenter wp-image-140 size-full" src="https://leveluppropertymanagement.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/New-Client-LevelUP-working-with-unique-luxury-apartments.png" alt="" width="801" height="529" /> We’ve really enjoyed working on this project. Being involved from shortly after the development was granted planning has been beneficial as we have been able to accurately prepare sustainability strategies, sinking funds and liaise with architects and engineers to maximise the services for residents. It’s also very close to our hearts as we have seen the building transform over the last year!We have attended Open Days, as well as conducting surveys and polls with potential residents deciding what amenities they would like on site, and the effect these will have on the service charge.We really enjoy working with clients who recognise the importance of what the residents want!If you want to find out how we are challenging traditional methods of propertymanagement then please do drop me a message.Thanks,Dan

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13
Aug
News
How To Change Property Management Company

<b>The number of disputes across the country with property management companies (also known as </b><a href="https://leveluppropertymanagement.com/block-management-company/"><b>block managers</b></a><b>) is rising fast. Ending a contract with your property manager due to the terms not being fulfilled is now a common occurrence – tenants are changing property managers more frequently than you think!</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">Not many leaseholders think they are able to change property managers, well they can! Before you change property manager you should ensure you understand the terms of the agreement and your legal rights. Get your facts right as ending a contract is very rarely straight forward, especially if one of the parties feels aggrieved by the action. If not, you may be breaching the lease too or could make the situation very tricky.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">LevelUP are experienced in assisting leaseholders, Right to Manage and RMC’s in changing management services and lease enfranchisement.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">So how can you change property managers? Our quick video on ‘How to Change Block Manager’ provides you with a step by step guide, or if you’d rather read the steps below.</span><b>Is there a cause to terminate?</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">Read the terms and check if they require cause in order to terminate the contract. Some do not. If cause is required, this will be described in the contract clearly. If no cause is required, you can terminate the contract for any reason.</span><b>Property manager breach</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">It would be in your best interest to terminate the contract if the managing agent has breached the terms of the contract. A breach can lead to putting your property and residents at risk. This should not be tolerated. Check over the contract to see whether the property manager has breached any terms. Identify the term that has been breached and gather any evidence of the breach to help with the request to terminate the contract.</span><b>Notice period</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">The contract will specify the notice period required to terminate the agreement; this can range from 30 – 90 days. If you do not abide by the notice period, your request to terminate may result in being ignored or as serious as being in breach yourself. Always be sure to pay attention to the notice period and follow it to the minimum length of time.</span><b>Providing notice to terminate</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">This should always be completed in writing with the date of which the termination will take effect. Do not email and always obtain proof of postage. This will ensure there is a written record of your notice to terminate. Include in your notice to terminate the reasons for terminating.</span><b>Receive confirmation</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">The agent should confirm the termination in writing stating the date at which management ceases. This continues the paper trail, and gives you a document that proves that the termination has been requested and completed. Be sure to keep the confirmation as evidence of the process.</span><b>Notify leaseholders</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">The leaseholders who pay a service charge should be notified that there is to be a change in the property manager. The current property manager may also do this. Notifying the leaseholders in writing is the best thing to do.</span><b>Handover of funds</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">At the stage of handover, the agent must hand over the balance of funds not required to meet commitments already made, with the balance being handed over with a statement of accounts. The balance should be passed within three months unless otherwise agreed.</span><b>Receive paperwork</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">The documentation that will be received at handover is that as stated in the management agreement.</span><h3><b>Your Three Property Management Change Options</b></h3><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you are unhappy with your property management company, you have several options to help you change. There are three primary ways to get your property management changed: asking as tribunal to appoint a new manager, using your Right to Manage, or setting up a Residents’ Association.</span><ol> <li><b> Appoint a new manager through a tribunal</b></li></ol><span style="font-weight: 400;">To appoint a new manager, it’s necessary to be able to prove bad management. For example, you might demonstrate that your manager hasn’t complied with an approved code of management practice. The first step is to send your landlord a Section 22 notice, which gives them the opportunity to fix the problems that you want to be addressed. If they fail to do this, you can apply to the First-Tier Tribunal to ask for a new manager to be appointed.</span><ol start="2"> <li><b> Exercise your Right to Manage</b></li></ol><span style="font-weight: 400;">Leaseholders of flats (although not houses) have a Right to Manage (RTM), which allows them to take over the management of their property. They can do this without the landlord’s permission by setting up a right to manage company. To exercise this right, it is not necessary to show your landlord is incompetent or hasn’t fulfilled their duties. A minimum number of leaseholders needs to take part to set up the company, and the building also needs to meet a few conditions. When the company has been established, it sends a notice to the landlord and can take over management of the company if successful.</span><ol start="3"> <li><b> Create a Residents’ Association</b></li></ol><span style="font-weight: 400;">Finally, you have the option of forming a Residents’ Association. This is a group of leaseholders who hold leases from the same landlord and with similar terms. The group represents the members to the landlord and can put them in a better position when dealing with issues between the residents and landlord. There are two ways to have the association formally recognised, which improves the group’s position. The secretary of the association can give a written notice to the landlord, or a certificate can be issued by the local Rent Assessment Committee.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">LevelUP are experienced in assisting leaseholders, Right to Manage and Residents Management Companies in changing property managers. We’re on a mission to change the way property management is carried out, delivering a transparent and open experience. The residents we look after can contact us at any time and even through social media. We want to build happy communities so if you’re looking for a property management company that cares, read more about our </span><a href="https://leveluppropertymanagement.com/residential-management/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">residential property management services here.</span></a><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">LevelUP are experienced in assisting leaseholders, Right to Manage and Residents Management Companies in changing management services. Please feel free to contact us for further information at </span></i><a href="http://mailto:info@leveluppropertymanagement.com/"><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">info@leveluppropertymanagement.com</span></i></a>

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Testimonials

Carla and her team have done some fantastic work supporting myself with portfolio of properties in a previous role. Carla and her team have always delivered a professional service and delivered some fantastic result while keeping there customers at heart of the business.

Jane Doe
Tennant

My dad has found himself in a bit of a situation with the property he was renting and had to take some very quick decisions… if it wasn’t for Dawn at Level Up, he would have had to go through a very hard time. Dawn has helped us with a completely kind, emphatic, yet professional attitude, and made a big difference to the whole process. We couldn’t be more happy. I highly recommend it!

Joe Bloggs
Tennant

After taking over the management of the property I reside in, Level Up Management has fixed all of the maintenance issues that have been ignored by previous companies fir more than 5 years.Through efforts of Level Up team, this property is now in decent state and has no problems. Level Up Management is a lovely team of professionals who know how to satisfy their clients. My special thanks go for Carla for making this happen for us. I would recommend Level Up to any one and every one.

Jane Doe
Tennant

The communication levels were excellent from levelup! Really easy to get hold of and very proactive in getting things sorted in our block! I’ve experienced numerous different property managers in a couple different developments and Freddy and the rest of the team have been a level above!

Joe Bloggs
Tennant

Since being transferred to level up the problems which I endured in my property have come to a swift and positive conclusion. Rapid response to any query I have and cannot thank Karla enough for all the work she’s done in ensuring the work in my property gets done quickly and to a professional standard. So glad to have been transferred to level up and to deal with a asset like Karla. Overall everyone I’ve dealt with in level up has been a great help and it’s a pleasure to come to them with any problems I may have.

Very professional company to deal with. Efficient and pro-active in their approach